FAQ

What is considered a preexisting condition for travel insurance

What counts as a pre existing medical condition for travel insurance?

A pre-existing medical condition can be any kind of illness, disability or injury that you have suffered from when or before you take out your travel insurance policy. It can also mean acute or chronic conditions you’ve recovered from and been given the all-clear such as cancer, or high blood pressure and cholesterol.

Can you get travel insurance if you have pre existing conditions?

You can obtain travel insurance but it will be mandatory to purchase coverage for your pre-existing condition. Your condition won’t be covered at all, but you can still purchase travel insurance that can cover you for events not related to your condition.

Is High Blood Pressure considered a preexisting condition for travel insurance?

Is high blood pressure considered a pre-existing condition for travel insurance? Yes, however high blood pressure is a pre-existing condition that is automatically covered by most policies at no additional charge unless it’s caused by another condition, like cardiovascular disease or diabetes.

Is asthma a pre existing medical condition for travel insurance?

For the purpose of Travel Insurance Asthma Cover — asthma is considered to be a pre-existing medical condition because it impacts on your respiratory health and often involves taking medication, or using an inhaler.

What pre existing conditions are not covered?

Examples of pre-existing conditions include cancer, asthma, diabetes or even being pregnant. Under the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), health insurance companies cannot refuse to cover you because of any pre-existing conditions nor can they charge you for more money for the coverage or subject you to a waiting period.

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Who covers pre existing conditions?

All Marketplace plans must cover treatment for pre-existing medical conditions. No insurance plan can reject you, charge you more, or refuse to pay for essential health benefits for any condition you had before your coverage started.

How far back does pre existing condition last?

HIPAA allows insurers to refuse to cover pre-existing medical conditions for up to the first twelve months after enrollment, or eighteen months in the case of late enrollment.

What is an example of a pre existing condition?

A pre-existing condition is a health problem you had before the date that your new health coverage starts. Epilepsy, cancer, diabetes, lupus, sleep apnea, and pregnancy are all examples of pre-existing conditions.

How long does pre existing condition last?

Most insurers count any condition you have had symptoms or treatment for in the past five years as pre-existing, even if it was diagnosed more than five years ago. But some insurers include any conditions you have had treatment for during the past three years or seven years.

Is High Blood Pressure considered a heart condition?

It is determined by the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries and the amount of blood your heart pumps. When you have high blood pressure it is a sign that your heart is having to work much harder than normal to pump the blood around you body, which can lead to heart disease.

Is high cholesterol considered a pre existing condition?

Even if your cholesterol level is well controlled by medication or diet, it is still regarded as a pre-existing medical condition and should be declared to ensure full cover.

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What is a pre existing condition waiver?

Simply put, the Waiver of Pre-Existing Medical Conditions covers, or “waives” the companies right to exclude pre-existing medical conditions from their policy. It’s a feature only available with certain comprehensive package plans that include trip cancellation/trip interruption.

Can asthma inhalers go on airplanes?

TSA allows larger amounts of medically necessary liquids, gels, and aerosols in reasonable quantities for your trip, but you must declare them to TSA officers at the checkpoint for inspection. We recommend, but do not require, that your medications be labeled to facilitate the security process.

Can you fly with an asthma inhaler?

The answer is yes, inhalers are safe on airplanes and you should definitely take your reliever (plus a spare) with you on the plane. Pack all your medicines into a clear plastic bag in your hand luggage and have a copy of a prescription for each of them in case you are questioned at security.

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